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Your First Ever Dog – 5 Things To Consider

Our pets are a member of our family. They offer hours of companionship and affection, not to mention fun and adventure. But they are, in their own way, a dependent. It’s a lot of responsibility for a first time pet owner to adjust to.

Whether you’re a single person looking for a furry friend for company, or a family in need of a new puppy as a protector and friend, getting your first family dog is a great adventure.

But it comes with a lot of responsibilities. There are changes you can make, to both your home and your lifestyle, to make sure your new dog stays healthy and happy – and so does your family.

Puppy Proof The House

Puppies are busy! And they tend to grow quickly. When you bring home your new dog, you’ll want to puppy or dog proof the house. Especially for young dogs, or dogs just being taught boundaries, the best thing to do is get a pet playpen or crate to give the dog a safe place inside the house. This isn’t about locking up the dog.

It’s about keeping the dog feeling secure, and understanding spaces that are his or are not. Once the dog is a little older, you can keep off-limits areas safe with baby gates. Cupboard doors, especially those carrying food, should be secured shut. Even a well-trained dog can only fight his own instincts for so long.

Secure the yard

It’s not a good idea to keep a dog out alone for the first six months. Many expert dog trainers even suggest having the dog leash attached to your clothes, or in your hand, as much as possible. But dogs are curious by nature, and any smell outside might set them running, especially in the first months, when they’re not sure of boundaries.

Depending on the side of your yard, there are different ways to secure your dog. You may want to fence an area off specifically for your dog. If you have a large property, you might choose something like an electric boundary fence, which warns the dog with a beep or buzz when they reach the boundary. By keeping your yard secure, you keep your dog safe when you’re training, and you never have to worry about the neighbors!

Get all your supplies

Dogs can be a lot of work! Having the right supplies from the beginning will make everything a lot easier. Your dog will need:

– a pet bed, either a crate, or a soft bed

– separate food and water dishes

– Leash

– treats

– Chew toys

You may also want ID tags before you get the dog, so you don’t have to worry about them running off. Dog shampoo, and a dog bath are also a good idea. Depending on the age of the dog, puppy pads are also essential while you’re house training.

Keeping Pets Clean and Healthy

A big part of pet care is keeping your pets clean and healthy. It’s good for them, and it stops the unpleasent pet smell from ending up all over your house. Set up a schedule to keep your pets bathed regularly, which cuts down on both fleas and dander.

Keeping a dog well-groomed will cut down on both allergies, both because it helps the dander and fur stay under control, and because a short-haired dog is less likely to bring the indoors outside. Buying a pet air purifier can also help cut down on pet dander and pet smells that can irritate allergies.

Set Boundaries Early And Often

The best way to train a dog is to be consistent yourself. If you’re determined to keep the dog off the bed, you can’t cave in and let them have it just this one night. Treat training is a great way to teach your dog boundaries. Sour apple spray is an effective way to stop your dog from chewing on the furniture.

Make sure everyone in the family knows the rules for the dog, and takes part in training. This will lead to a well-mannered, easy-going dog that will know what is expected of him in any situation.

Prepping your home for a dog is an important step in pet ownership. Whether this means getting everything your dog will need, helping family members know what to expect, or puppy proofing your home, your new furry addition will need a lot of guidance. it’s important to be prepared, for the health and safety of your dog, and for the sake of your family and your home.


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